Lights ControlControl of Dial Lamp output
Turret Warning Lights Indicates that all Turrets are properly stored.
Radio Compass A navigational device that gives a bearing by determining the direction of incoming radio waves transmitted from a particular radio station or beacon.
Tuning MeterIndicates the strength of the signal.
Power Setting Chart Finding the optimum Power Settings for Take-offs, Cruise, Climbs, Landings and Stalling Speed  required consideration of cruise altitude, outside temperature, aircraft weight, and desired true airspeed.
Videos
Loop L-R KnobUsed to obtain maximum signal strength as indicated by head-set volume by tuning the knob L or R.
Norden Bombsight
Throttles
Emergency Brake Lever Two handles, one for Left and Right Brakes.
Spare LampsSpares for the Control Indicator Light.
Bomb Salvo Bonb Release.
Control Push ButtonThe Radio Compass may be operate from either of two Control Boxes but not both at the same time. Depressing this button establishes "Control" with that box, highlighted by the Green Control Indicator Light.
Control Indicator LightIndicates which Radio Compress Control Box has "Control".
Wing Flaps The Flaps or lowered 45° for landing and 25° to assist in taking off.
Function Selector Switch OFF: Shut downCOMP: For automatic Direction FindingANT: Receive Aural Signals with the Whip AntennaLOOP: Use            a. If difficult on ANT due to precipitation static            b. In the "Aural-null" Direction Finding method
Flight Engineer Stand
Clock Question Did the Clock keep time from where they took off from, or where they were currently flying over,  or did they adjust it as they flew.
Stores Jettison (Click Green Background To  Close) Provides the capability of phase jettison of all external stores or symmetrical jettison of fuel tanks. EMER JETT ALL:  Applies 28 volts from essential dc bus to all stores stations when the helicopter weight is off the wheels.
Interphone Jack Box (BC-366) Provides communication between crew members throughout the airplane. One is mounted at each crew station. T-30 Throat Microphones are also furnished at all stations. The box contains a Volumn Control and a 5 position Selector Knob. COMP: Output of the Radio Compass Receiver may be heard.LIAISON: Output of the Liaison Receiver and Transmitter Sidetone may be heard.COMMAND: Command Receiver output and Transmitter Sidetone may be heard.INTER: Communication is possible with all other Interphone Jack Boxes and their selectors similarly positioned.CALL:  Microphone output will override the radio outputs and will be heard at all stations without regard to the position of their selector switches. 
Tuning CrankHelps select station frequencies by turning the Crank to a positionn producing the greatest clockwise indication of tuning meter.
Volume ControlRegulates Head-Set Volume.
Airplane Commander
Parking Brake Lever The Pilot depresses Rudder Pedals and pulls out this Lever to set Brakes.
Pilot's Airspeed Indicator It tells you how fast you're going. Or it measures the difference in pressure between what is generally around the craft and the increased pressure caused by propulsion. The needle tracks the pressure differential but the dial is marked off as Airspeed. Typically in knots.
Radio Compass Control Box (Click Green Background To  Close) A navigational device that gives a bearing by determining the direction of incoming radio waves transmitted from a particular radio station or beacon.  There are two control boxes, one is mounted at the Copilot's Position and the other at the Radio Operator's Station. 
Propeller RPM Limit Indicator Lights Warning Lights The engines are fitted with Hamilton standard, three-bladed, constant-speed, full feathering propellers.
Pilot's Turn Indicator  I'm not sure how this Indicator differs from the Bank and Turn Indicator, or for that matter, the Direction Indicator. They all tell you what direction you'll moving in.
C1 Automatic Pilot Controls (Click Green Background To  Close) The C-1 Autopilot is an electromechanical robot which automatically controls the airplane in straight and level flight, or maneuvers the airplane in response to the fingertip control of the human pilot or bombardier.
CoPilot's Rate of Climb Indicator Indicates whether the aircraft is climbing, descending, or in level flight. The Rate of Climb or descent is indicated in feet per minute. If properly calibrated, this indicator will register zero in level flight.
Turbo Boost Selector Each Engine has two B-11 type exhaust-driven  Turbo-Supercharger which boost manifold pressure for takeoff and provides sea-level air pressure at high altitudes. All superchargers are simultaneously adjusted by this dial.
Master RPM Control No Information.
Flap Position Indicator Indicates Flap Position in degrees from 0° to 45° in 5° increments.
CoPilot's Airspeed Indicator It tells you how fast you're going. Or it measures the difference in pressure between what is generally around the craft and the increased pressure caused by propulsion. The needle tracks the pressure differential but the dial is marked off as Airspeed. Typically in knots.
Control Surface Lock Lever Locks/Unlocks all of the controllable Control Surfaces at once.
Turn ControlEnables the pilot to make coordinated turns with the Autopilot.
Cockpit Layout
Bomb Doors Opens and Closes Bomb Bay Doors.
CoPilot's Altimeter A aneroid barometer designed to register changes in atmospheric pressure accompanying changes in altitude.
Turn ControlTurns the airplane while flying under Automatic Control.
CoPilot's Bank & Turn Indicator   The Bank Indicator consist of a curved glass tube filled with a damping liquid in which a small steel ball rolls. As the craft Banks, gravity holds the ball at the lowest point of the curved tube, indicating the Angle of Banking. The Turn Indicator contains a gyroscope that develops a torque when the craft rotates. This torque controls a pointer that indicates to the pilot in degrees per unit of time the rate at which the craft is turning.
Landing Gear Switch Lowers and Raises Landing Gears.
B-29 Airplane Commander (Click Green Background To  Close) Meet the Superfortress. The B-29 is just what the name implies… a Superfortress… a bigger and better B-17.  As it's Commander, you, your crew and your airplane are a combat force all within yourself - a small, but specialized army. The B–29 is the first of the "very heavy bombers". Actually, in physical size it is not much larger than a B–17 or a B-24, but it's weight and power are twice theirs and it's speed is considerably greater.  It is designed to carry heavy loads for long distances at higher speeds and higher altitudes. Early in 1939, when studies were started to determine just how to produce a bomber bigger and better then the BP–17, the XB–29 came into being. It's basic design was determined in 1940. Three airplanes were built as prototypes for the actual production of the B–29, the first of these taking to the air in the fall of 1942. The airplane is equipped with five, power-operated gun turrets, remotely controlled, with each turret housing two .50-caliber machine guns. The tail turret also houses one 20-mm cannon. It can carry up to 20,000 pounds of bombs to a target 2,667 mi away and capable of flying at a speed of 400 mph. FUSELAGEThe fuselage is of ail-metal, semimonocoque design, with stressed skin, extruded longerons, and formed circumferential of aluminum alloy. With minor exceptions, flush rivets are used exclusively to attach the skin to the fuselage structure. There are three pressurized compartments: one in the forward part of the airplane, one aft of the rear bomb bay, and one in the extreme aft portion of the ship. WINGThe wing consists of an inboard section permanently attached to the fuselage and two removable outer panels provided with detachable tips, Fuel compartments equipped with self-sealing tanks are an integral part of the inboard wing section structure. Ailerons provided with trim tabs, are hinged to the outboard panels, and electrically operated wing flaps form the lower surface of the inboard wing trailing edge from the fuselage to the outboard wing joint. The leading edge sections are removable and provide access to cables, wiring, tubing, and miscellaneous equipment. LANDING GEARThe main landing gear is a cantilever type, consisting of two air–oil shock strut assemblies, upon each of which are mounded two wheels with 56 inch tires. Retraction is accomplished electronically and a alternative motor is provided for emergency operation of the gear in the event of power or motor failure. The Main Landing Gear wheels are each equipped with expander tube–type hydraulic brakes, operated in the conventional manner from the rudder pedals. The Nose Gear operates simultaneously with the main landing gear and consists of a trunnion, a compression strut, two torsion links, a universal assembly, a retracting mechanism, A single air–oil shock strut and dual wheels equipped with 36 inch smooth tires. The wheel and axle assembly and turn through 360°. Within 15° each side of the center position,  however a cam and roller mechanism will return the gear to the center position. A towing lug is provided near the center of the axle assembly, and a shock absorber is mounted on the shock strut, to prevent wheel shimmy. The B-29 is a teamwork airplane, and you are the captain of that team. Your success in combat, and the safety of your crew and airplane, will depend on how well you organize your team and how well you lead it. You can't fly the B–29 by yourself. You need the full cooperation of your crew and you can get that cooperation only if the morale of your crew is good. Your crew is made up of specialists, everyone an expert in his line. Know their capabilities as well as their shortcomings. Know them as men as well as specialist! As Airplane Commander you should:01. Know your airplane and how it operates.02. Be able to take off and land in the minimum distance.03. Be able to take off and land under zero-zero conditions.04. Be able to fly under instrument conditions either with or without radio aids.05. Be able to use blind-landing systems.06. Be able to navigate and locate your positions with the various radio and radar aids available.07. Be proficient at formation flying, including the proper performance of evasive tactics at various speeds and altitudes.08. Be able to get the most out of your airplane under all conditions.09. Know your crew.10. Know yourself. Your Copilot is your assistant—the executive officer of your command post. He should be able to do everything that you can do so that he can assume full command should the occasion arise. You and he should be virtually interchangeable. Let him handle the controls at least 30% of the time. He should be a potential Airplane Commander. Your Bombardier-DR Navigator must:01. Understand the bombsight, radar equipment, and automatic pilot in so far as they pertain to bombing.02. Understand the normal and emergency operation of bombs, bomb racks, switches, controls, releases, doors, etc.03. Understand and be able to operate the computing CFC sight.04. Be proficient at pilotage and dead reckoning.05. Be proficient at target identification. Your Navigator-Radar Specialist must:01. Be proficient at pilotage, dead reckoning, and celestial navigation.02. Understand the operation of, and be able to use, all available radio and radar equipment for navigation and bombing.03. Be able to perform minor maintenance on all radar equipment.04. Be proficient at target identification. Your Flight Engineer is an important member of your B-29 combat team. He runs your airplane while you and your Copilot fly it. In actual flight, he relieves you and your Copilot of duties and responsibilities. On the ground, he supervises maintenance and keeps your airplane flyable. He should:01. Understand the operation and maintenance of all mechanical equipment.02. Be thoroughly familiar with the engines and fuel, electrical, and oil systems.03. Be thoroughly familiar with the cruise control charts, weights and balance, and all operating procedures.04. Be thoroughly familiar with the pressurized cabin system.05. Be thoroughly familiar with the putt-putt and auxiliary electrical system.06. Be thoroughly familiar with the oxygen system.07. Be thoroughly familiar with all fire-fighting equipment. Your Radio Operator should:01. Be thoroughly familiar with the operation and maintenance of all radio equipment aboard the airplane.02. Be thoroughly familiar with the use of all radio navigational aids.03. Be proficient in transmitting and receiving.04. Be thoroughly familiar with IFF procedures and equipment.05. Understand the operation and care of the radio compass.06. Be thoroughly familiar with AAF instrument approach procedures and the signal operation instructions, radio                  authentication, special codes for the day, weather codes, blinker codes and radio call signs. Your Central Fire Control Specialist Gunner should:01. Be thoroughly familiar with the care, maintenance, and operation of the entire central fire control system.02. Be thoroughly familiar with the loading and servicing of the turrets. Your Specialist Gunners should:01. Know how to operate the computing sight.02. Be thoroughly familiar with the central fire control system.03. Know how to load and repair turrets.04. Know their specialty.  No crew is ever anymore on the ball then it's Airplane Commander. Your success as the Airplane Commander will depend in a large measure on the respect, confidence, and trust which the crew feels for you. You can be a good CO and still be a regular guy. You can command respect from your men, and still be one of them.
Landing Gear Indicator Lights Warning Lights.
CoPilot's Turn Indicator  I'm not sure how this Indicator differs from the Bank and Turn Indicator, or for that matter, the Direction Indicator. They all tell you what direction you'll moving in.
Unknown Switches I'm not completely sure what these Switches do, though I do have a sketchy idea of their use. Possibly… Propeller Feathering SwitchesPhone–Call Signal Light SwitchesAlarm Bell SwitchLight Switches
Pilot's Bank & Turn Indicator   The Bank Indicator consist of a curved glass tube filled with a damping liquid in which a small steel ball rolls. As the craft Banks, gravity holds the ball at the lowest point of the curved tube, indicating the Angle of Banking. The Turn Indicator contains a gyroscope that develops a torque when the craft rotates. This torque controls a pointer that indicates to the pilot in degrees per unit of time the rate at which the craft is turning.
 B-29 Superfortress
SwitchesMasterAileonRudderElevatorServo / PDI 
Gyro Horizon Used to inform the pilot of the orientation of the aircraft relative to Earth's horizon. It indicates pitch (fore and aft tilt) and bank or roll (side to side tilt) and is a primary instrument for flight in instrument meteorological conditions.
Propeller RPM Switches I think to Increase or Decrease RPM to Propellers.
Control TransferShifts the Turn Control operation to a remote turn control station in either the Bombardier's or Navigator's compartment. 
Master Synchronizer Controls No Information.
Tell-Tale LightsShow when the Electrical Trim of the Autopilot agrees with the Manual Trim of the airplane for the corresponding control surface. (A) Ailerons, (R) Rudder and (E) Elevator
Pilot's Rate of Climb Indicator Indicates whether the aircraft is climbing, descending, or in level flight. The Rate of Climb or descent is indicated in feet per minute. If properly calibrated, this indicator will register zero in level flight.
Tell-Tale Light Shutter Knob Regulates the brightness of the Tail–Tale Lights.
Sensitivity Regulates the distance the airplane is allowed to deviate from straight and level flight before the servo units applies control to correct the deviation for the corresponding control surface.(AIL) Ailerons, (RUD) Rudder and (ELEV) Elevator
DME Indicator (L)  Indicates distance in miles to the tuned NAV1 station, if DME is available. Standby Course Deviation Indicator (R) Shows Deviation from the set course in Degrees Minus (left) orPpositive (right).
Manifold Pressure Gages Measure the pressure inside the induction system of an engine.  This measurement, which is read in inches of mercury or “in hg”, is one of the best methods to determine just how much power is being developed by the engine.
Band MeterIndicates the frequency.
Pilot's Altimeter A aneroid barometer designed to register changes in atmospheric pressure accompanying changes in altitude.
Unknown Box I have NO idea what this box does. But I do know that there are two of them, the one here, and another one just left of the Pilot's seat.  I'm thinking that they may not be, part of the original equipment. Can anybody help me here?
CenteringComparable to the Trim tabs and are used to compensate for slight changes in the corresponding control surface.(AIL) Ailerons, (RUD) Rudder and (ELEV) Elevator
Ratio Regulates the amount the servo units moves the control surface for any given deviation for the corresponding control surface.(AIL) Ailerons, (RUD) Rudder and (ELEV) Elevator
Turn Compensation Compensation for Bank, Skid and Elevation for the corresponding control surface.(AIL) Ailerons, (RUD) Rudder and (ELEV) Elevator
Inverter Warning Lights No Information.
Tachometers Measures the working speed of an engine, typically in Revolutions Per Minute (RPM).
Band Selector KnobSelects station or beacon frequencies.
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Plot Direction Indicator (PDI) A instrument controlled by the Bombardier that instructs the pilot on the correct heading during the last few minutes of a bomb run. The best bombardier in the service couldn't hit the target if his pilot is slow to follow the PDI.   Voice instructions from the Bombardier to the Pilot, was more common.
Instrument CLICK
Pilot's Throttles Click
Throttles
Pilot's Rudders
Elevator Trim Tab
Copilot's Rudders
Copilot's Throttles Click
Norden Bombsight CLICK
Click
C1 Autopilot Click
Pilot's Seat CLICK
CoPilot's Seat CLICK
Radio Compass Control Box CLICK
Unknown
"FiFi" The World's Only Flying B-29 BomberBoeing B-29A-60-BN Superfortress, S/N 44-62070, Civil Registration N529B, is one of only a few surviving in existence and the only one currently flying as of May 2015 out of Addison, Texas, based at Commemorative Air Force. .
The B-29 Flight Engineer U.S. Army Air Forces 1944 military training film detailing the Flight Engineer's job during a B-29 flight.The film is narrated by future President Ronald Reagan, and the Copilot is played by John Payne, well known Film Actor best remembered for his leading role in the movie "Miracle on 34th Street" a perennial Christmas favorite. 
B-29 Flight Procedure and Combat Crew FunctioningU.S. Army Air Forces 1944 military training film detailing airplane commander's position, flight procedure and forward crew assignments on the B-29 bomber aircraft. This film has been edited!
Back To Cockpit
Construction of B-29 "Superfortress" BombersPromotional film on the construction of a B-29 at a unknown location during World War II.
The B-29 Norden BombsightU.S. Army Air Forces 1944 military training film detailing the operation of the Norden Bombsight.